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Horse Chestnut

£4.50£26.00

Horse Chestnut

£4.50£26.00

Family: Hippocastanaceae

Habitat/Cultivation: Woodland, parks and garden canopy. The ripe chestnut should be gathered as they fall from the trees in September and October.

Parts used: The fruit that is the Horse chestnut, leaves and bark

Traditional use: Rheumatism, Varicose veins, neuralgia, rectal complaints, dizziness, headache, spasmodic asthma, it was regarded as a remedy for congestion and engorgement. Dull and aching pains in any part of the body hepatic region one specific indication.

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Description

Common name: Horse chestnut, Conker.

Family: Hippocastanaceae

Habitat/Cultivation: Woodland, parks and garden canopy. The ripe chestnut should be gathered as they fall from the trees in September and October.

Parts used: The fruit that is the Horse chestnut, leaves and bark

Traditional use: Rheumatism, Varicose veins, neuralgia, rectal complaints, dizziness, headache, spasmodic asthma, it was regarded as a remedy for congestion and engorgement. Dull and aching pains in any part of the body hepatic region one specific indication.

Constituents: Saponins (aescin), tannin, flavones, starch, fatty oil, glycosides aesculin and fraxin

Actions: Astringent, circulatory tonic.

Medicinal use: The unique actions are on the vessels of the circulatory system. It seems to increase the strength and tone of the veins. Used internally to aid the body in the treatment of inflammation in the vein varicosity, also haemorrhoids. Externally it may be used as a lotion for the same conditions as well as ulcers.

Cautions: Seed is rich in saponins and these must be removed before it is used as a food

Research: clinical trials have determined insufficiency on chronic venous. Varicose veins, oedema of the lower limbs, decrease the incidence of deep venous thrombosis following surgery.

Dosage & forms: Powdered seed – use 1 tsp with hot water as an infusion as and when needed. Tincture 1ml of tincture three times daily, Max 30ml per week

Folk-lore: The seeds and bark have been extensively used in European traditional medicines since the 16th century.

References:

Hoffman,  D.,(1990) Holistic Herbal.GB. Elements books Ltd.

Mills, S., Bone, K. (2000)Principles and Practices of Phytotherapy: modern herbal medicine. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.

 

Additional information

Weight N/A
Weight/Volume

100g, 100ml, 250g, 250ml, 25ml, 500g, 500ml, 50g, 50ml

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